Is CBD Legal? Marijuana-derived CBD products are illegal on the federal level, but are legal under some state laws. Hemp-derived CBD products (with less than 0.3 percent THC) are legal on the federal level, but are still illegal under some state laws. Check your state's laws and those of anywhere you travel. Keep in mind that nonprescription CBD products are not FDA-approved, and may be inaccurately labeled. 

A newcomer to our CBD oils ranking, RE: Botanicals is no stranger to hemp. Founded by John Roulac, a long-time hemp advocate and founder of the organic superfoods brand Nutiva, RE: Botanicals is one of the only CBD brands to earn the USDA organic seal. They deserve a shout-out for prioritizing regenerative agriculture, while keeping prices reasonable.   
Luckily, it’s possible to procure CBD oil that has no THC in it. Products made from CBD Isolate or Broad Spectrum CBD can be good options if you want to avoid THC. In fact, some of the best CBD products for pain include topical salves that can be made from isolate CBD oil. Just be sure to check out third-party lab reports to ensure you’re getting exactly what you pay for. And keep your eyes peeled for future research on CBD for pain.
CBD oil is not legal everywhere. It is banned/restricted by countries such as UAE, Dubai, and Saudi Arabia. Although CBD oil is illegal in many of the US states too, some have legalized its use for medicinal purposes. While the number would be ever-changing, as of 2016 there are 17 states in the US which have legalized the use of low THC, high CBD products for medical reasons in limited situations. These states include Alabama, Georgia, Iowa, Kentucky, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Wisconsin, Wyoming, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Virginia. It is advisable to consult your local health specialist before use.
Did you know that cannabis oil contains all 21 known amino acids? Plus it’s rich in essential fatty acids such as Omega-3 and Omega-6 which are vital for our internal body and skin. These acids help combat daily problems that our skin is the first to take on, whether it be from inclement weather, sun exposure, dry climates, UV or other daily factors. Problems that can lead to a variety of medical issues such as eczema, psoriasis and even skin cancer.
Apply it by massaging the cream to the affected area. Use in small amounts first then reapply it if necessary. Some consumers claim that this cream works best in morning and in evening. You can apply this cream on your back, shoulders, knees or other affected area. The smell of this cream goes away quickly so you won’t be bothered if you don’t like its smell.
The statements made regarding these products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. The efficacy of these products has not been confirmed by FDA-approved research. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. All information presented here is not meant as a substitute for or alternative to information from health care practitioners. Please consult your health care professional about potential interactions or other possible complications before using any product.
CBD creams and lotions are infused with cannabidiol. Manufacturers claim that CBD products can be used as a pain reliever. They are commonly used for soreness, irritated skin, and inflammation. There is a difference between taking CBD and applying it on the skin. By applying it on the skin, there are no side effects compared to taking it orally. CBD is similar with THC just without the psychoactive effect. CBD creams and lotions can be an alternative for those who are not comfortable in taking THC.
Did you know that cannabis oil contains all 21 known amino acids? Plus it’s rich in essential fatty acids such as Omega-3 and Omega-6 which are vital for our internal body and skin. These acids help combat daily problems that our skin is the first to take on, whether it be from inclement weather, sun exposure, dry climates, UV or other daily factors. Problems that can lead to a variety of medical issues such as eczema, psoriasis and even skin cancer.
All of the product reviews listed on this website are real reviews from real users. Recommended brands are selected solely based on merit. Our vetting process includes analysis of product quality based on third party lab reports, customer service quality and responsiveness, industry reputation, company longevity and customer feedback. Per FTC guidelines, we do participate in the affiliate programs of some but not all of the recommended brands whereby we receive a small commission on purchases made through links on this website. Any references to third party products, prices or websites referenced in this group are subject to change without notice.
Previously, I had reviewed hemp-based beauty topicals and THC beauty products pioneering the way for cannabis in the skincare industry. This time, I tested the diverse range of CBD oil-based beauty products, which are both potent and legally available for shipping to most states. This is the new frontier in skincare—and these companies are paving the way. Go support them before Sephora hears about this.
CBD oil may be of some benefit to those with addiction, suggests a review published in the journal Substance Abuse in 2015. In their analysis of 14 previously published studies, scientists determined that CBD may have therapeutic effects in people with opioid, cocaine, and/or psychostimulant addiction. They also found that CBD may be beneficial in the treatment of cannabis and tobacco addiction. There is some evidence that CBD may block or reduce the effects of THC on the mind.
Previously, I had reviewed hemp-based beauty topicals and THC beauty products pioneering the way for cannabis in the skincare industry. This time, I tested the diverse range of CBD oil-based beauty products, which are both potent and legally available for shipping to most states. This is the new frontier in skincare—and these companies are paving the way. Go support them before Sephora hears about this.
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Oils are hot in the beauty world. As a beauty editor, I’ve slathered everything short of butter onto my face: argan, coconut, rosehip, sandalwood, chia, neroli, calendula, mandarin, macadamia, rice bran, seabuckthorn, patchouli, grapefruit seed, sesame seed, soybean, sweet almond, pomegranate seed, lemon myrtle, sunflower seed—even extra virgin olive oil from my pantry when I was desperate. I’ve washed my face with oil-based cleansers, and dabbed expensive mixtures being sold as “face oils” onto my skin in hopes of achieving that Instagram-ready glow. Contrary to popular belief, the right oil is actually good for your face and won’t clog your pores. Your skin needs a reasonable amount of oil to do its business; as a matter of fact, if you scrub away all your natural face oil (as I was prone to do with rubbing alcohol as a frustrated and misguided pizza-faced teen), you may actually be prone to more breakouts as your skin tries to make up for the imbalance. As cannabis meets up with the mainstream beauty world, cannabidiol (CBD) oil may be the next big thing.
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