According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 116 people died every-day from opioid-related drug overdoses in 2016. Forty percent of these deaths involved a prescription opioid and in 2017, the government declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency. Opioids are typically prescribed by health care providers as a way to manage and treat pain. But what if there was a better solution?
CBD, on the other hand, was shown to help regulate fear responses by “reducing amygdalar responses to fearful stimuli…and to elicit antipanic effects.” A 2017 article in Current Neuropharmacology backs up this claim. Reviewing both experimental lab animal and human studies, the researchers came to the conclusion that “CBD seems to be a promising drug for the treatment of PD [panic disorder]”.
Another field in which CBD is creating a buzz is in the area of mood disorders like anxiety and depression. Both conditions have been treated with a variety of medications, courtesy of Big Pharma, that have had varying levels of success. Again, the long list of side effects can be off-putting to someone who just wants to get through the day without the sweaty tension of anxiety or the gray haze of depression.

After reviewing the brands above, our team believes that these two companies are manufacturing some of the highest quality hemp-based CBD oils on the market. Further, they are suggested to contain some of the strongest and purest formulas outside of the MMJ market. PureKana in particular seems to have perfected the full-spectrum extraction process, as you can see in their labsheets.


There’s no definite amount that’s appropriate for everyone, but the ratio of CBD to THC will indicate how psychoactive the product is and if it’s legal in your state. The more CBD compared with THC, the less of a high, and vice versa. “Managing psychoactivity is key to successful cannabis therapy,” says Lee. “Amounts should be made clear on the label and lab-certified so people know what’s helping them and what’s not.”
The use of CBD is safe, with a few non-serious potential side effects. This is shown by the studies and that is what doctors and scientists say. Most CBD users do not experience any of these side effects. Even in very high doses of CBD there is no toxicity. However, everyone is unique and the body chemistry of each individual is slightly different.
With so many brands on the market, the competition for the best CBD oil for pain is a close one. But if you’re looking for a straightforward winner, look no further than Fab. The company offers reasonable pricing, excellent customer service, and a high level of transparency when it comes to their hemp sourcing and lab results. And most importantly, their CBD oils and topicals are some of the highest-quality CBD products you can buy. Can using CBD for pain be a viable treatment option? How do you find the best CBD for pain? Pain is one of the most elemental human experiences — every person alive will experience it at some point. And if you suffer from pain on a regular basis — whatever its source — you’ll know that it doesn’t take long to encounter the limits of pain medications. Everyone is looking for the magical cure that will take away their pain without replacing it with obnoxious, and even dangerous, side effects. CBD might not be a magical cure, but it’s probably the closest thing to it.  
In a small study published in the journal JCI Insight in 2017, researchers observed that CBD may help prevent stress-related changes in blood pressure. For the study, nine healthy male volunteers took a single dose of either CBD or placebo. Compared to those given the placebo, those treated with CBD had lower blood pressure both before and after experiencing a stressful event.

Extraction: The method by which CBD oil is processed from hemp plants can be very telling. Some manufacturers extract and process the oil using toxic materials like propane or butane; in most cases, these oils are cheaply priced. Safer extraction and processing agents include ethanol, which cleans the hemp plant of unwanted toxins; and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction, which strips harmful materials from the plant by changing the carbon dioxide’s temperature and pressure settings.


In a separate publication, Brazilian researchers conducted a large-scale study on contemporary academic data involving the use of CBD as an anxiolytic (anxiety reducer). After reviewing dozens of global published studies in English, Spanish, and Portuguese, it was determined that a “clear anxiolytic-like effect of CBD [exists],” and that CBD was “shown to reduce anxiety in patients with social anxiety disorder.”
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I have been totally off the effexor and all anti-depressants for 2 weeks now. The dizziness is getting much better however my emotions/agitation are horrible. I cry at everything and am extremely crabby/agitated. I realize most of this has to do with the withdrawal. I really want to see this through to find out if I can live without anti-depressants but at the same time I know it's very hard on my family. I have another doctor appt beginning of April and she says that if I don't feel better by then I most likely will need to go back on an anti-depressant. For the most part I agree with her. My hopes of proving her wrong as getting slim however. I'd like to know how long it took some of you who have withdrawn from anti-depressants to feel somewhat 'normal' or you knew you had to go back on them? I guess I'm asking if another month is a good amount of time for me to determine what I should do. In some ways I feel like I should start on them again now but I'm not going there yet? BTW, I am in no way feeling suicidal. Mornings seem to be my worst time and by early evenings I feel somewhat better – is this strange too? I haven't tried the CBD living water yet but did find a place near me to get it. Just havent had the time to get there. I also have the Ativan which I take one night to help with sleep. I'm trying not to take it unless really necessary. Tomorrow I have a huge even that my husband and I are in charge of so I'm planning to take an Ativan in the morning to get me through the day without falling apart (crying scene) in front of everyone (or yelling at them) :)! Thanks for all your input!! 
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