Unlike THC, which primarily binds to CB-1 receptors located in the brain, CBD works in the body by manipulating receptors throughout organ tissues, the immune system, the pain response system, the hormonal system, and other whole-body regulatory systems. Basically, since its receptors have been found to exist in virtually every cell and tissue type in the body, CBD is believed to work on every aspect of human health and behavior – from the subcellular level to the whole-body leve and beyond.

CO2 extraction is one of the most common ways CBD is extracted from the hemp or cannabis plants. This method uses expensive equipment that adjusts temperature and pressure to extract the cannabinoids from the plant material, without damaging them. The other common method is to use solvents like ethanol or butane to extract the plant material. These solvents have to be burned off the final product which may damage the cannabinoids or terpenes in the process. There is also a risk that these solvents may not have burned off completely and could end up in your end product.
CBD is one of the cannabinoids found in the cannabis plant and the other one is THC. Both of these cannabinoids bind with the CB1 receptors. However, when THC binds with the receptor you experience the so-called high feeling. That does not happen when CBD binds with the receptor. In fact, CBD can actually reduce the effects of THC. This is possible as CBD modifies the receptors in such a way that the amount of THC that binds with the receptor decreases. Also, when you are feeling high your heart rate increases dramatically, but this effect is reduced by CBD. Thus, CBD can reduce anxiety.

A natural plant extract, CBD (or cannabidiol) has made a huge stir in the health scene over the last decade. It’s not hard to find plentiful anecdotal evidence of its benefits — people are using CBD for pain relief, mood regulation, cancer prevention, even seizure reduction. But if you’re in pain, you’re probably looking for more than anecdotal evidence. We get it — and we’re here to help.


Historically, hemp could legally be grown and cultivated for academic research purposes only. However, the legality of hemp growth has changed in the past year. In April 2018, Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky introduced the Hemp Farming Act of 2018, a piece of legislation that proposed legalizing all hemp products at the federal level. The act was incorporated in the 2018 United States Farm Bill, which passed in both the House and Senate in December 2018. Per the farm bill, industrial hemp will be descheduled as a federally controlled substance.
CBD oil contains CBD (and often other active compounds) in a carrier oil. There are a number of forms of CBD oil, including softgel capsules, tinctures, and under-the-tongue sprays. Some forms of CBD oil can also be applied directly to the skin, in the form of products like creams and salves. The concentration of CBD varies from product to product.
Most human studies of CBD have been done on people who have seizures, and the FDA recently approved the first CBD-based drug, Epidiolex, for rare forms of epilepsy. Clinical trials for other conditions are promising, but tiny. In one Brazilian study published in 2011 of people with generalized social anxiety disorder, for example, taking a 600-mg dose of CBD (higher than a typical dose from a tincture) lessened discomfort more than a placebo, but only a dozen people were given the pill.
I have been totally off the effexor and all anti-depressants for 2 weeks now. The dizziness is getting much better however my emotions/agitation are horrible. I cry at everything and am extremely crabby/agitated. I realize most of this has to do with the withdrawal. I really want to see this through to find out if I can live without anti-depressants but at the same time I know it's very hard on my family. I have another doctor appt beginning of April and she says that if I don't feel better by then I most likely will need to go back on an anti-depressant. For the most part I agree with her. My hopes of proving her wrong as getting slim however. I'd like to know how long it took some of you who have withdrawn from anti-depressants to feel somewhat 'normal' or you knew you had to go back on them? I guess I'm asking if another month is a good amount of time for me to determine what I should do. In some ways I feel like I should start on them again now but I'm not going there yet? BTW, I am in no way feeling suicidal. Mornings seem to be my worst time and by early evenings I feel somewhat better – is this strange too? I haven't tried the CBD living water yet but did find a place near me to get it. Just havent had the time to get there. I also have the Ativan which I take one night to help with sleep. I'm trying not to take it unless really necessary. Tomorrow I have a huge even that my husband and I are in charge of so I'm planning to take an Ativan in the morning to get me through the day without falling apart (crying scene) in front of everyone (or yelling at them) :)! Thanks for all your input!!
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