I’ve been on anti-depressants for 11 years since having a stroke and having to stop taking estrogen. I started on Zoloft, then celexa, then Effexor. I’ve been having bad blurry vision for a few years that has my eye dr stumped. Finally my primary doctor thought it could be the Effexor since that is one of the side effects. So we decided that I would wean off the Effexor and try Wellbutrin instead. I lowered the amount of Effexor over 3 weeks till I wasn’t taking it any longer but started the Wellbutrin the last week of taking Effexor. After 3 days of no Effexor the withdrawals seemed to hit me. Headaches, nausea, extremely emotional, and bad dizziness. I had an important event to go to on day 3 of no Effexor so I took a low dose (37.5 mg) hoping to get me through the night. I felt decent for a couple days then boom, the withdrawal symptoms came on fully again. So I decided I would just try to go off both the Effexor and Wellbutrin because I didn’t want to go through this again and really wanted to see if I could handle life without them. Well it’s been a week without any Effexor but the dizziness and emotional outrages are still going on. I’ve been using Bonine (motion sickness) which does seem to help a little. My daughter mentioned the CBD oil which I was totally against at first but after doing a lot of research I am now quite interested in it.
Ranging from irritating to debilitating, joint pain can be tricky to treat. If your pain is mild, ibuprofen or acetaminophen might be adequate. But the worse it gets, the more likely you are to be prescribed antidepressants, muscle relaxants, or even opioids. Because of the side effects associated with these prescription medications, there has been quite a bit of research on CBD and joint pain — with promising results. Here are a few studies that point to CBD’s potential:
Truth be told, one of the biggest draws to using CBD oil for pain has been the fact that it has little distinguishable side-effects or contraindications with other medications. In fact, in a massive report that was published by the World Health Organization during last year’s 2017 Expert Committee on Drug Dependence, it was (finally) declared to the world that CBD is a “safe, well tolerated [compound, which] is not associated with any significant adverse public health effects.”
I have been taking 50 Mg daily CBD oil with morphine (MS Contin) for almost 5 months with no problems. I actually have been able to decrease my morphine dosage to 2 times a day instead of 3 due to considerably less pain. I have also stopped taking every oral prescription med except the morphine. My morphine dosage was only 15 mg 3 times which is considered low. I sleep better, feel calmer, am not cold all the time and I hope to be able to discontinue the morphine. I live in a state that has legalized marijuana so I hope to grow some low THC to harvest my own oil.
If your intention is to help treat chronic pain, then you may want to start out with a lower dose, and then proceed from there. If you notice effective results, you can downsize the dose, or likewise you can always up the dose until positive results are achieved. The key is to only increase your dosage in small increments so that you are able to pinpoint exactly how much CBD oil it takes to treat your condition. Be advised, though, that you should not exceed the recommended daily doses that are listed on the bottle and you should consult with a physician.
I am new to taking CBD oil. I am getting sever chest pain and stomach pains after taking. I am looking for knowledgeable accurate accountable info on where to get top quality CBD oil. I find it helps with my anger, anxiety and depression. I am hoping it will help with my muscle weakness and inflammation but I feel I will have to stop taking it becasue of the side effects. I am simply looking for exceptional quality and ingredients. I am currently using Canntrust product and its carrier is MCT oil I believe. I could really use some advice. I don’t want to go back to having to take steroids. Please help. (Also, I am in Ontario, Canada)
I believe the itching could be from the CBD oil as i have heard this before but i have also heard that it can also be a reaction to the agent they mix the oil with. I too am taking CBD oil for pain from spinal surgery and no negative reactions so far and the benefits are incredible (no pain). There are now so many ways to take CBD’s that if one doesn’t seem to fit or has negative side effects, try another delivery option. Also, I would try changing the supplier and purchase only the best product that you can find or afford. I had a negative experience with one supplier where their product gave me a bad headache, I changed suppliers (little more expensive) and the headaches stopped.
@ Donna I’ve have been using products from a new company who teamed up with a biotechnology company who has been extracting oil and they have a proprietary extraction method that allows for nanotechnology. Meaning particles are broken down small enough to pass through your liver and you reap better results. I have been in chronic pain for different issues since an automobile accident and I must say since May I have not only been taking my oils buy I now putting hemp into my like with hemp hearts and hemp based shakes. Which is allowing me to get a balanced omega 3,6,9 and bunch of amino acids are body needs. Put hemp in your step and get healthy with out the hi. My name us Norina Lelii friend me on face book would love to educate more on this marvelous plant.

Few doctors will be able to willfully answer the question of ‘what’s the best CBD dose for anxiety.’ There is just too little clinical evidence available. That said, it is still imperative to consult with a physician (preferably a cannabis expert or ‘420 doctor’) when it comes to dosing CBD oil for anxiety. Since CBD oil is not yet approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), there is little reliable dosing data available online.
Success stories like Oliver’s are everywhere, but there’s not a lot of data to back up those results. That’s because CBD comes from cannabis and, like nearly all other parts of the plant, is categorized by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) as a Schedule 1 drug—the most restrictive classification. (Others on that list: heroin, Ecstasy, and peyote.) This classification, which cannabis advocates have tried for years to change, keeps cannabis-derived products, including CBD, from being properly studied in the U.S.
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