Dispensaries: In states where marijuana is legal for recreational use, dispensaries are a common sight. They are much rarer in states with more restrictions. In states that permit the use of medical marijuana, hemp-based CBD oils do not normally require a prescription but marijuana-based oils do. Like brick-and-mortar locations, dispensaries offer more customer service. However, as noted, this may not be an option depending on the buyer’s state of residence. Also, CBD oil prices tend to be significantly higher at dispensaries.
In fact, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Epidiolex (a drug made with a purified form of CBD oil) in June 2018 for the treatment of seizures associated with two rare and severe forms of epilepsy in patients 2 years of age and older. These two epilepsy forms are known as Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome. Epidiolex is the first FDA-approved drug that contains a purified drug substance derived from marijuana.
A report from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published in the journal Pediatrics cautions pregnant women and nursing mothers to avoid marijuana use due to possible adverse developmental effects to their baby. In a study reviewed for the report, short-term exposure to CBD was found to increase the permeability of the placental barrier, potentially placing the fetus at risk from certain substances.

That leaves those touting CBD’s effectiveness pointing primarily to research in mice and petri dishes. There, CBD (sometimes combined with small amounts of THC) has shown promise for helping pain, neurological conditions like anxiety and PTSD, and the immune system—and therefore potentially arthritis, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, cancer, and more.

Scott Shannon, MD, assistant clinical professor at the University of Colorado, recently sifted through patient charts from his four-doctor practice to document CBD’s effects on anxiety. His study, as yet unpublished, found “a fairly rapid decrease in anxiety scores that appears to persist for months,” he says. But he says he can’t discount a placebo effect, especially since “there’s a lot of hype right now.”


“After ten years of regular seizure activity and an anxiety disorder which developed in response to the fear of the seizures, I have been offered a gift of a substance in CBD drops which have reduced the number of seizures and helped ease the anxiety. It has only been a week that I have been taking this wonderful tincture but my life has changed for the better. I had begun to give up hope. There was a valuable lesson for me. Never give up.” Jessica M purchased Cibdex: Cannabidiol Tincture 100mg


Vanderbilt researchers have conducted a study in 2001 that dealt with the presence of CB1 receptors found in the central amygdala region of the mouse’s brain. This is the area of the brain that deals with stress responses and anxiety. The study has proved that these receptors do exist in the mouse’s brain. Also, they found that the excitability of the mouse’s brain decreased whenever endocannabinoids reacted with these receptors. These researchers have also stated that further study is needed to further research must be done to verify this finding.

75 YRS YOUNG, retired police officer. Bad back, neck, cranial surgery, prostrate surgery broken arm with picked nerve, 4 way bypass, can’t get a good night sleep. 6 weeks ago, My Primary care told me to get 100% pure CBD oil. He did for his injured knee. I did and my pain is 95% gone. My anxiety at night is also gone, no xanax. No pain pills. Have a dry mouth in the morning. Started with 500mg 1 drop under the tongue before bed, and morning. After a couple of day, mostly gone. 70%.. I kicked it up to 2 drops. Now pain free and no problems. My wife 65yrs, bad knees and back. Sleepless,a
Another reported side effect of CBD administration is an unpleasant dry sensation in the mouth. This effect seems to be caused by the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the inhibition of saliva secretion. A study published by Argentinian researchers back in 2006 showed that cannabinoid receptors (type 1 and 2) are present in the submandibular glands which are responsible for producing saliva.
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